Michael Reisch

Landscape, 7/002 (2007)

About this artwork

In 2007, the National Galleries of Scotland commissioned Reisch to create a series of works to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the birth of Scottish engineer, Thomas Telford. Reisch responded to Telford’s dramatic intervention in the Highland landscape with an equally spectacular transformation of his own. Using the latest modelling software, he produced views of nature artificially generated on the computer. His ‘Scottish’ landscapes are at once recognisable and fictitious, a vague semblance of both art and nature.

Michael Reisch

Michael Reisch

Reisch studied Photography and Sculpture at ‘Gerrite Rietveld Academie’, Amsterdam, from 1986-1991. This was followed by an influential year studying under photographer Bernd Becher at the ‘Kunstakademie’, Düsseldorf. Reisch’s photographic images challenge the very basis of photography: the idea that the medium somehow confirms the shape of the world. At the same time, in his creation of an ideal view, the artist references a long tradition of landscape art. With all signs of people and habitation removed, Reisch’s photographs take on a utopian, even primordial dimension. Familiar landscapes become strange and distant, realised entirely in themselves. His landscapes appear as fractured idylls, which fluctuate “between paradise and nightmares of genetic engineering”.