Andy Warhol

Woman with Hat (1957)

About this artwork

This work is one of many that Warhol referred to as his “Golden Pictures”. In 1956 he travelled the world and the art of the Far East undoubtedly influenced his fascination with gold the following year. His travelling companion, Charles Lisanby, commented that it was particularly the gold furniture with painted black designs from Bangkok that inspired Warhol. However, there are other possible influences. Warhol was raised in the Catholic Orthodox Church, which used gold-covered icons in its worship. Also, it is likely that he was aware of the gold paintings New York artist Robert Rauschenberg produced in 1953. Warhol’s use of gold leaf to cover the entire figure, with only the detail of her facial features highlighted, creates the feeling that she is a deity awaiting worship.

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  • title: Woman with Hat
  • accession number: AR00281
  • artist: Andy WarholAmerican (1928 - 1987)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Work on paper
  • date created: 1957
  • measurements: 73.70 x 58.10 cm
  • credit line: ARTIST ROOMS National Galleries of Scotland and Tate. Acquired jointly through The d'Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund 2008
  • copyright: © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London 2016.
This artwork is part of Artist Rooms

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol was born 'Andrew Warhola' to Slovakian immigrant parents living in Pittsburgh in America. Warhol's subject matter was taken from popular culture, in the form of advertising, comics, magazines and packaging. He was able to produce his works quickly by transferring images onto canvas or paper through photography and screenprinting, sometimes with the help of assistants. Warhol stated that he wanted to make works that showed no trace of having been produced by hand. His interest in mass production reflected the fast-developing consumer culture he recognised in America. His New York studio, 'The Factory,' became a popular meeting place for artists, drop-outs, celebrities and bands.