Gerhard Richter

Abstraktes Bild (Silikat) (880-4) [Abstract Painting (Silicate)] (2002)

About this artwork

After 2000, Richter made a number of works that dealt with scientific phenomena, in particular, with aspects of reality that can’t be seen by the naked eye. In this painting, the repeated pattern of forms, albeit indistinct and out of focus, relate to the compound, silicate. Richter depicts the substance at a minute scale, which contrasts with the enormous physical size of the work, creating an apparently abstract interpretation of the substance.

  • title: Abstraktes Bild (Silikat) (880-4) [Abstract Painting (Silicate)]
  • accession number: AR00029
  • artist: Gerhard RichterGerman (born 1932)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • medium: Aluminium
  • date created: 2002
  • measurements: overall: 2204 mm x 1544 mm x 55 mm
  • credit line: ARTIST ROOMS National Galleries of Scotland and Tate. Acquired jointly through The d'Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund 2008
  • copyright: © Gerhard Richter
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve
This artwork is part of Artist Rooms

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

Richter was born in Dresden, where he studied from 1952 to 1957. In 1961 he settled in Düsseldorf, where he studied under Joseph Beuys. In 1963 he began using images from press photographs and amateur snapshots in his paintings, deliberately blurring them in order to undermine and challenge the boundaries of painting and photography. In the early 1970s Richter explored theoretical ideas about colour in a series of colour charts. In a similar systematic way he made a large number of grey paintings in which he experimented with texture and brushstrokes. Since the late 1970s Richter has painted an ongoing series of colourful abstractions and alternated these with painstakingly accurate renderings in paint of photographs of landscapes, people and still lifes.