Edouard Vuillard

Deux ouvrières dans l'atelier de couture [Two Seamstresses in the Workroom] (1893)

About this artwork

This was probably the first painting by Vuillard to enter a British collection. Vuillard gave it to the Scottish artist Charles Mackie and his wife Anne when they visited Paris in 1893. The women seen in profile in the painting worked for Vuillard's mother in her corset and dress-making business. For a few years in the early 1890s Vuillard's paintings became so highly patterned that they verged on abstraction. It is likely that his day-to-day contact with patterned materials through his mother's work influenced his very intricate, decorative style of painting.

  • title: Deux ouvrières dans l'atelier de couture [Two Seamstresses in the Workroom]
  • accession number: GMA 3583
  • artist: Edouard VuillardFrench (1868 - 1940)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Interior Crafts and practical arts Symbolism
  • date created: 1893
  • measurements: 13.30 x 19.40 cm
  • credit line: Purchased with assistance from the Art Fund (Scottish Fund) and the National Heritage Memorial Fund 1990
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Edouard Vuillard

Edouard Vuillard

Vuillard was born near Lyon, but the family moved to Paris in 1878. His father died when he was fifteen and thereafter his mother, who ran a small corset and dress-making business from home, became the dominant influence in his life. Many of Vuillard's paintings of the turn of the century are small in scale and depict apparently mundane interiors or record everyday episodes in domestic, middle-class life. These were subjects few other artists thought worthy of attention. His paintings of this type are usually referred to as 'intimiste'.