Ed Ruscha

DANCE? (1973)

About this artwork

This work highlights Ruscha’s preoccupation with the symbols of American popular culture of the 1960s and 1970s, with the monosyllabic invitation to dance invoking light-hearted entertainment. An unlikely array of materials were used to create it, including coffee, egg white, mustard, chilli sauce, ketchup and cheddar cheese. These edible ingredients suggest the kind of foodstuffs that might be consumed in an American diner, and are in particular the condiments that accompany typically American fast food such as hotdogs and hamburgers.

see media
  • title: DANCE?
  • accession number: AR00046
  • artist: Ed RuschaAmerican (born 1937)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • date created: 1973
  • measurements: 137.20 x 152.00 x 2.90 cm (framed: 144.10 x 159.20 x 7.00 cm)
  • credit line: ARTIST ROOMS National Galleries of Scotland and Tate. Acquired jointly through The d'Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund 2008
  • copyright: © Ed Ruscha.
This artwork is part of Artist Rooms

Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha

Ruscha was born in Omaha, Nebraska. He grew up in Oklahoma and studied in Los Angeles. Ruscha's work is diverse and experimental. Since childhood he has been interested in commercial art, in the form of advertising, comic books and magazines. This led to his first paintings featuring words, produced in the late 1950s. Ruscha is equally known for his books of deadpan photographs, such as 'Twenty-six Gasoline Stations' of 1963 and volumes of banal photographs of buildings. In his work Ruscha aims to challenge accepted concepts of language and meaning, often by combining unrelated words and images.