Dennis Ramsay

Dame Flora MacLeod of MacLeod, 1878 - 1976. 28th Clan Chief (1956)

About this artwork

Dame Flora MacLeod of MacLeod was born at 10 Downing Street, London, the home of her grandfather who was Chancellor of the Exchequer. In 1901 she married Hubert Walter, with whom she had two daughters. When her father, Sir Reginald, became Chief of the Clan MacLeod in 1929, she was elected President of the Clan’s Society. She went to live with her father at Dunvegan Castle in Skye and became a County Councillor. On the death of her father in 1935 Flora MacLeod inherited the estate and was recognised as Clan Chief. After the Second World War she travelled widely, establishing Clan MacLeod Societies throughout the Commonwealth. She was honoured with a DBE and died in 1976, aged 97. This portrait depicts her in traditional Clan Tartan with Dunvegan Castle in the background.

Dennis Ramsay

Dennis Ramsay

Dennis Ramsay is a painter in the classical tradition and a distant relative of the famous Scottish artist Allan Ramsay. Born in London of Scottish decent, he studied architecture at University College London and between 1953 and 1955 trained as an artist in Florence, with Pietro Annigoni. There, he was taught how to paint in oil tempera, a type of paint whereby pigments are mixed with egg yolk, oils and a preservative – for which Ramsay used whisky! His portraits and still-lifes are highly detailed with luminous colours and a glossy finish. Important sitters include Princess Alexandra, Sir Winston Churchill and Prince Philip. The latter portrait was commissioned for the prince’s 80th birthday. Ramsay now lives in Australia and his works are in collections around the world.