Ed Ruscha

The Final End (1992)

About this artwork

The widescreen format of this painting, the words ‘The End’ and the ‘trompe l’oeil’ imitation of scratched film suggest the closing credits of a classic Hollywood film. Here the text appears in gothic lettering, perhaps alluding to the parallels between Hollywood and religious experience It is encased by weeds and overgrown grass, which may indicate the death of cinema, or at least the decline of its golden age.

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  • title: The Final End
  • accession number: AR00596
  • artist: Ed RuschaAmerican (born 1937)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • date created: 1992
  • measurements: 178.00 x 350.70 x 4.00 cm
  • credit line: ARTIST ROOMS National Galleries of Scotland and Tate. Acquired jointly through The d'Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund 2008
  • copyright: © ED RUSCHA
This artwork is part of Artist Rooms

Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha

Ruscha was born in Omaha, Nebraska. He grew up in Oklahoma and studied in Los Angeles. Ruscha's work is diverse and experimental. Since childhood he has been interested in commercial art, in the form of advertising, comic books and magazines. This led to his first paintings featuring words, produced in the late 1950s. Ruscha is equally known for his books of deadpan photographs, such as 'Twenty-six Gasoline Stations' of 1963 and volumes of banal photographs of buildings. In his work Ruscha aims to challenge accepted concepts of language and meaning, often by combining unrelated words and images.