About this artwork

During the First World War, Peploe wrote to fellow Scottish Colourist, FCB Cadell: “When the war is over I shall go to the Hebrides, and recover some vision I have lost. There is something marvellous about the western seas.” Encouraged by Cadell, Peploe first visited the Hebridean island of Iona in 1920 and he returned virtually every summer thereafter. He painted almost exclusively on the northern end of the island. This gentle work, really a sketch in oil paint, would have been painted on the spot as this view caught the artist’s eye.

Samuel John Peploe

Samuel John Peploe

Peploe is one of the group of four artists known as the 'Scottish Colourists.' Born in Edinburgh, he studied art in Paris and lived there from 1910 to 1912. It was through painting holidays in Northern France that he was introduced to the use of bold colour, inspired by the bright sunlight. He later experienced the same intensity of light while painting on the island of Iona, off the west coast of Scotland. French painting proved to be a powerful influence for Peploe throughout his life. Although his work never became abstract, it was characterised by tight composition, strong colour and assured handling.