Joan Miro

Peinture [Painting] (1925)

About this artwork

From 1925 to 1927, Miró produced a series of 'automatic paintings.' Greatly celebrated by the Surrealists, the paintings were inspired by images from Miró's unconscious. These pictures featured forms that had been reduced to lines and suspended in empty space, as if floating in front of the background. Legend has it that the artist would sometimes paint in a state of hallucination owing to extreme hunger, staring at a blank surface until images began to suggest themselves. However, many of the 'automatic paintings' had preliminary sketches and are not as random as they may at first seem.

see media
  • title: Peinture [Painting]
  • accession number: GMA 2078
  • artist: Joan MiroSpanish (1893 - 1983)
  • gallery: On Loan
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Dreams, illusions and memory Surrealism
  • date created: 1925
  • measurements: 140.00 x 113.50 cm (framed: 170.00 x 138.30 x 8.70 cm)
  • credit line: Purchased 1979
  • copyright: © Succession Miro/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2016.
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Joan Miro

Joan Miro

Miró was born in Barcelona and moved to Paris in 1920. His early work combined miniaturist detail with a cubist fragmentation of space. In Paris he abandoned this style and began to paint an imaginary world full of strange, insect-like figures and forms, which seemed to float in space. This fantastic sign language, which was partly inspired by images from the artist's unconscious mind, soon became a hallmark of Surrealist art. Although he spent time away from Spain, Miró remained interested in Catalonian folklore throughout his career.