Richard Long

Macduff Circle (2002)

About this artwork

Long uses both lines and circles in his work, as they are ancient, primitive signs (as in Stonehenge, for example), and have the same simplicity and grandeur as the landscape itself. The circle is a universal symbol of perfection and the infinite, since it has no beginning and no end. This work is named after the Macduff slate of which it is made. Although the pieces of slate that make up the work are irregular in size, the overall shape of the sculpture is circular and there is a careful balance between smaller and larger pieces. The work can be found in the grounds of the Dean Gallery, in a position specially chosen by the artist.

  • title: Macduff Circle
  • accession number: GMA 4483
  • artist: Richard LongEnglish (born 1945)
  • gallery: Scottish National Gallery Of Modern Art Two(On Display)
  • object type: Sculpture
  • date created: 2002
  • measurements: Diameter: 800.00 cm
  • credit line: Presented by Anthony and Anne d'Offay in honour of Richard Calvocoressi's fifteen years' directorship of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art 2002
  • copyright: © Richard Long.

Richard Long

Richard Long

Long was born in Bristol, where he still lives. His work is about walking and the direct experience of nature. He trained from 1966-68 at St Martin's School of Art in London, where several of his contemporaries were busy questioning traditional forms of art. From the mid-1960s, while still a student, he began making walks and photographed the trace he had made (the flattened grass, stones laid at regular intervals) or would simply mark the course of the walk on a map. Later, he began laying rocks or twigs in straight lines or circles. By the late 1970s he was reconstructing these works in interior settings, though the walk remained the basis for collecting the natural material. Long won the Turner prize in 1989.