About this artwork

In 1929 Hunter embarked upon a series of paintings of Loch Lomond, north-west of Glasgow, and the village of Balloch which lies at the southern end of the loch. After spending time on the continent, Hunter had lightened his palette in response to the strong Mediterranean light, and his handling of paint had become bolder and more fluent. He had painted in the same area in 1924 but his later works are clear and unfussy in composition. In this painting, the sparkle of light and reflections on the surface of the loch are the main focus.

  • title: Reflections, Balloch
  • accession number: GMA 18
  • artist: George Leslie HunterScottish (1877 - 1931)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Rivers Scottish Colourists
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: About 1929 - 1930
  • measurements: 63.50 x 76.20 cm (framed: 87.20 x 99.70 x 10.6 0 cm)
  • credit line: Presented by Mr William McInnes 1933
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

George Leslie Hunter

George Leslie Hunter

Hunter was born in Rothesay on the Isle of Bute. His family emigrated to California in 1892 and by the turn of the century he was making a living there as an illustrator. Little is known of Hunter's early work as much of it was destroyed in the San Francisco earthquake of 1906. He moved to Glasgow soon afterwards. During the 1920s Hunter emerged alongside Cadell, Fergusson and Peploe as one of a group of artists who became known as 'Scottish Colourists'. They were all influenced, in varying degrees, by the pure, bright colour and loose brushwork of French Impressionsim, Post-Impressionism and fauve painting.