Bill Brandt

Loch Slapin, Isle of Skye (1947)

About this artwork

The 1940s was a period of transition for Brandt as he moved away from the interest he took in social issues in the 1930s towards a more contemplative style. Like other artists in the post-war period, Brandt turned to rural themes in a search for continuity and tradition rather than innovation and disruption. Armed with a Kodak camera with no shutter and a wide-angle lens with a pinhole aperture, he was able to look at the world 'like a mouse, a fish or a fly'. The use of steep perspective in this picture creates a dramatic sense of space.

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Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt

After early beginnings in Vienna and Paris, Bill Brandt came into his own in Britain during the 1930s when he photographed life in the depressed industrial towns of northern England. During the 1940s he created a series of portraits of famous British and international artists. He collaborated with publications such as Lilliput, Picture Post and Harper's Bazaar. The 1950s saw him preoccupied with landscape photography and the outdoor nudes. His first retrospective was held in New York in 1969, marking the beginning of a period of international recognition for Brandt: numerous exhibitions and awards in Europe and the United States.