About this artwork

Although Boudin is associated mainly with the Normandy coast, during the 1890s he regularly wintered in the south of France, painting at Antibes, Beaulieu, Nice, Juan-les-Pins and Villefranche-sur-Mer. He had first travelled to the area in 1885 due to poor health. Villefranche lies on the Mediterranean coast to the east of Nice, and Boudin recorded many views of the harbour, citadel and surrounding landscape. The town has a deep-water harbour, capable of accommodating large boats. In this picture sailors in the right foreground are waiting to be transported across to their ships anchored in the harbour. The old Service de Santé, where sailors would have a medical check-up after arriving at the port, is visible on the right at the end of the pier.

  • title: Villefranche Harbour
  • accession number: NG 2373
  • artist: Louis-Eugene BoudinFrench (1824 - 1898)
  • gallery: On Loan
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Military and naval Harbours and quays
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: 1892
  • measurements: 46.00 x 65.00 cm (framed: 64.21 x 88.26 x 10.16 cm)
  • credit line: Bequest of Agnes Anderson; received from the estate of her daughter Mrs Jessie B Agnew 1979
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Louis-Eugene Boudin

Louis-Eugene Boudin

Boudin, one of the most distinguished French artists of the second half of the nineteenth century, contributed directly to the development of Impressionism through his active encouragement of Monet. His open air sketches and paintings of the Normandy coast, capturing the effects of light and atmosphere with vigorous brush work inspired the younger artist to pursue his interests in similar directions. Boudin's sympathetic response to the sea and coast developed as a young cabin boy. He then became a stationer and framer in Le Havre before receiving a scholarship to study painting in Paris. Boudin settled in Honfleur in 1860 and contributed to the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874.