About this artwork

Sea-bathing became fashionable in France in the second half of the nineteenth century and Boudin began painting scenes of holidaymakers on the beach at Trouville and Deauville as early as 1862. These works were so popular that he soon developed a smaller format and sketchy technique, painting rapidly in the open air. In this work holidaymakers (mostly women) sit and chat in small groups, stroll up and down the beach or observe the boats in the bay.

Louis-Eugene Boudin

Louis-Eugene Boudin

Boudin, one of the most distinguished French artists of the second half of the nineteenth century, contributed directly to the development of Impressionism through his active encouragement of Monet. His open air sketches and paintings of the Normandy coast, capturing the effects of light and atmosphere with vigorous brush work inspired the younger artist to pursue his interests in similar directions. Boudin's sympathetic response to the sea and coast developed as a young cabin boy. He then became a stationer and framer in Le Havre before receiving a scholarship to study painting in Paris. Boudin settled in Honfleur in 1860 and contributed to the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874.