Eduardo Paolozzi

Vulcan (1998 - 1999)

About this artwork

Vulcan was the Roman god of fire and the blacksmith who forged weapons for the gods and heroes. He was lame, which is the reason he is aided by a support here. In Paolozzi's work, Vulcan (or his Greek counterpart, Hephaestus) is often seen as the archetypal sculptor. This impressive sculpture is in the Dean Gallery and reaches from the ground floor to the ceiling of the first floor. Vulcan is shown swinging his hammer and marching across the Great Hall. He is half-man and half-machine - a monument to the modern age.

Eduardo Paolozzi

Eduardo Paolozzi

Of Italian descent, Paolozzi was born in Leith near Edinburgh. He studied in Edinburgh and London and spent two years in Paris from 1947, where he produced enigmatic, bronze sculptures reminiscent of those by Giacometti. During the same period he made a series of dada and surrealist-inspired collages in which magazine advertisements, cartoons and machine parts are combined, thus anticipating the concerns of Pop Art. Alongside teaching at various art schools he developed his printmaking and sculpture. Paolozzi was particularly interested in the mass media and in science and technology.

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