About this artwork

Sisley enjoyed painting water and here captured splendidly the spume and spray of the river as it slides over the foreground weir or gushes through the barrier beyond. The weir breaks the flow of the River Thames to create a floating basin and to direct water into Mosley Lock. Sisley depicted the view upstream from Hampton Court Bridge, to the west of London, with Ash Island and the northern bank of the Thames beyond. The group of bathers included at the left provides human interest and a sense of scale, while blending perfectly with the river scene.

  • title: Molesey Weir, Hampton Court
  • accession number: NG 2235
  • artist: Alfred SisleyFrench (1839 - 1899)
  • gallery: Scottish National Gallery(In Storage)
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Rivers Impressionism
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: 1874
  • measurements: 51.10 x 68.80 cm (framed: 74.90 x 92.70 x 10.50 cm)
  • credit line: Presented by Sir Alexander Maitland in memory of his wife Rosalind 1960
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Alfred Sisley

Alfred Sisley

Sisley was one of the most consistent of Impressionist painters, concentrating almost exclusively on landscapes. He was born in Paris to Anglo-French parents and sent to London to train for the family business. His family, however, supported his decision to paint. In 1863 he entered Gleyre's studio in Paris and met Monet, Renoir and Bazille. Their resulting friendship determined the course of his painting. As an Impressionist he concentrated on capturing the changing effects of light, painting directly from nature with short lively brushstrokes. Sisley contributed to four of the eight Impressionist exhibitions held between 1874 and 1886.