Douglas Gordon

Self-portrait as Kurt Cobain, as Andy Warhol, as Myra Hindley, as Marilyn Monroe (1996)

About this artwork

In this self-portrait, Gordon merges and mimics iconic images of well-known blondes - Cobain, Warhol, Hindley and Monroe - in a single photograph. All the figures appropriated by Gordon had obviously dyed hair, and the artist contrasts their often notorious life histories with ideas of purity traditionally associated with blondeness. Gordon's pose also refers to 'Rrose Sélavy', the notorious alter ego of the Dada artist, Marcel Duchamp.

Douglas Gordon

Douglas Gordon

Gordon was born in Glasgow and studied at Glasgow School of Art and the Slade School of Fine Art, London. He has worked in video, photography, sound, text and other media and uses predominantly 'found' material. Gordon is fascinated by our binary nature and our tendency to split things into opposites: black and white, good and evil. His work investigates ambiguity and the disruption of the normal, accepted ways of seeing the world. He is one of the most successful of contemporary Scottish artists, winning prestigious art prizes in Europe and the United States, including the Turner Prize in 1996. Important shows have been staged in Frankfurt (2011), Edinburgh and New York (2006), London and Bregenz (2002), Los Angeles (2001), Liverpool and Paris (2000), and Eindhoven (1995). He teaches at the Städelschule, Frankfurt and lives and works in Berlin and Glasgow.