About this artwork

Walton's skilful brushwork has created a remarkable sense of immediacy and realism in this depiction of the two children resting on a leafy river bank. The picture was Walton's first large scale painting and his first treatment of an outdoor theme in which figures dominate the composition. It reflects the influence of the French painters Millet and Bastien-Lepage in its subject and restrained tones. He began painting the work outside at Cockburnspath, Berwickshire and completed it in Helensburgh in 1885. It was exhibited at the Glasgow Institute in 1887 and favourably reviewed.

Edward Arthur Walton

Edward Arthur Walton

Walton and his artist friends formed a group known as the Glasgow Boys. They were inspired by developments in landscape painting in France and sought to explore the natural effects of light in the open air through painting Scottish rural subjects. Walton spent a year in Dusseldorf and studied at the Glasgow School of Art, but gained most experience working with his friends at Cockburnspath, Berwickshire and Cambuskenneth, Stirling. He specialised in landscapes and portraits. He settled with his family in Edinburgh in 1904 after a successful decade in London. Walton was elected to the Royal Scottish Academy in 1905.