About this artwork

More's painting celebrates the dramatic beauty and power of nature. Cora Linn is generally considered to be the finest of the Clyde's three great waterfalls just outside Lanark. The deep shadow of the foreground, the splintered tree and overhanging rocks frame the dazzling cascades. The small figure group gazing in wonder at the magnificent scene provides a sense of scale and complements the viewer's response to the painting. Sir Joshua Reynolds bought Cora Linn when More exhibited the series of Clyde Falls in London in 1771. The others in the series are Bonnington Linn (Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge) and Stonehouse Linn (private collection).

Jacob More

Jacob More

More initially worked as a painter of stage scenery for the New Theatre in Edinburgh before concentrating on landscape painting. He had trained with Robert Norie and Alexander Nasmyth, combining observation from nature with a strong sense of formal design. His views of the Clyde Falls established his artistic reputation in Edinburgh and London. In early 1771, he moved to London where his work attracted the attention of Sir Joshua Reynolds, President of the Royal Academy. More then travelled to Rome and decided to settle there. He enjoyed international acclaim as 'More of Rome', working with Allan Ramsay and painting classical landscapes.