About this artwork

Scheveningen is a small fishing village near The Hague that was popular with artists as it was seen as unspoiled. At the time, Scheveningen had no harbour, and the local fishing boats were built with flat undersides (‘bomschuiten’) so that they could be dragged onto the sand and secured. The lack of harbour caused controversy among the locals, as a series of bad storms in 1860 and 1881 had devastated parts of the town and its fishing fleet. Many residents believed a harbour would have provided a measure of protection. Following another storm in 1894, the villagers finally agreed on the construction a modern harbour, which was completed in 1904. In this painting, Maris shows the ‘bomschuiten’ bouncing on the turbulent sea, while a small figure on the shore line battles against the wind.

  • title: Scheveningen
  • accession number: NG 1051
  • artist: Jacob MarisDutch (1837 - 1899)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Fishing industry
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: About 1880 - 1885
  • measurements: 43.80 x 30.20 cm (framed: 68.60 x 54.60 x 10.10 cm)
  • credit line: Bequest of Hugh A. Laird 1911
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Jacob Maris

Jacob Maris

Born in The Hague, Maris trained in Antwerp and Paris, where he was greatly influenced by the art of the Barbizon painters. Much of his early work consisted of domestic scenes of figures. When Jacob returned to his native town in the summer of 1871, he had turned his back on figurative painting to concentrate on landscapes. These he tackled with his distinctive bold style. Maris’s masterful ability to capture light and atmosphere is evident in the numerous paintings he made of the same scene in slightly varying conditions. He became one of the most important members of an influential group of painters collectively known as the 'Hague School'. Despite teaching only three formal pupils (including his brother Willem), Maris’s paintings exerted an enormous influence on a number of artists.