About this artwork

Situated on the west coast of Kintyre and exposed to the full force of the Atlantic Ocean, Machrihanish Bay offers the longest continuous stretch of sand in Argyll. The fluid handling of this pure landscape with its long horizontal rhythms and precise touches (the brown seaweed on the shore and the white flicks of the breaking wave) suggest the influence of Whistler and, in particular, of his famous Nocturnes.

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William McTaggart

William McTaggart

McTaggart's land and seascapes reflect his fascination with nature and man's relationship with it. His bold colours and vigorous brushwork find parallels in Impressionist painting, although essentially form part of a distinct Scottish tradition. They also echo qualities in paintings by Constable and Turner, whom he admired. McTaggart was born on the Mull of Kintyre and returned there frequently from his studio in Glasgow and later from his home in Broomieknow, just outside Edinburgh. He trained in Edinburgh at the Trustees' Academy and enjoyed early success when elected as an Associate of the Royal Scottish Academy aged twenty-four.