About this artwork

The small girl has just straightened up after cutting a cabbage and looks directly at the viewer. Girl and landscape seem inextricably merged in this essentially Scottish scene. A hind was a skilled farm labourer, and cabbage (or kail) a staple diet of Scottish hinds and their families. Guthrie painted the picture in the Berwickshire village of Cockburnspath, where he opted to stay during the winter, unlike his Glasgow friends who returned to the city at the end of the summer. The warm earth colours and distinctive square brush strokes confirm the profound impact Bastien-Lepage's painting made on Guthrie.

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  • title: A Hind's Daughter
  • accession number: NG 2142
  • artist: Sir James GuthrieScottish (1859 - 1930)
  • gallery: On Loan
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Parks and gardens Glasgow Boys
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: 1883
  • measurements: 91.50 x 76.20 cm (Framed: 105.60 x 90.40 x 6.70 cm)
  • credit line: Bequest of Sir James Lewis Caw 1951
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Sir James Guthrie

Sir James Guthrie

Guthrie became one of the leading painters in the group of artists called the Glasgow Boys. His early works of rural subjects painted with broad square brush strokes show the strong influence of French painters such as Bastien-Lepage. Guthrie was born in Greenock and trained as a lawyer before turning to art. After brief but stimulating periods in London and Paris, he committed himself to painting directly from nature in Scotland. Guthrie also experimented with pastel drawings and established a reputation as a successful portrait painter. He became president of the Royal Scottish Academy in 1902 and was knighted the following year.