Otto Dix

Mädchen auf Fell [Nude Girl on a Fur] (1932)

About this artwork

Dix was never afraid to paint his subjects in unflinching detail, often altering what he saw in order to heighten the sense of unglamourised reality. Here, the girl's left leg is twisted in an awkward manner so that her genitals are displayed at the centre of the painting. The style and composition of this work is influenced by German Renaissance artists, such as Lucas Cranach the Elder and Albrecht Dürer. Dix also employed a similar painting technique to the Old Masters, notable for its linearity and his use of glazes.

  • title: Mädchen auf Fell [Nude Girl on a Fur]
  • accession number: GMA 2195
  • artist: Otto DixGerman (1891 - 1969)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Nudity
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: 1932
  • measurements: 98.50 x 142.80 cm (framed: 112.00 x 157.00 x 4.50 cm)
  • credit line: Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. Purchased 1980.
  • copyright: © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2016.
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Otto Dix

Otto Dix

The German artist, Otto Dix, began his career painting in an expressionist style. The experience of fighting in the First World War profoundly affected him and he subsequently produced controversial works depicting the horrors of trench warfare in a minutely detailed and realist style. He became one of the leading artists of the 'Neue Sachlichkeit' (New Objectivity) school. His work was highly critical of the Weimar Republic and extremely satirical, showing the decay of contemporary society. When the Nazis came to power, his paintings were denounced as degenerate. He was sacked from his teaching post at Dresden Academy and forced to paint only inoffensive landscapes. After the Second World War, his subjects were mainly religious or of post-war suffering.