About this artwork

Bough first sketched this view in 1837, choosing a vantage point already made popular by the great English landscape painter J.M.W. Turner. This painting of 1863 is based on Bough's earlier sketch, and shows many of the chief features of Berwick. The town had been fought over by England and Scotland for centuries, changing hands no less than thirteen times between 1296 and 1482. The Old Bridge, today one of three bridges spanning the River Tweed at this point, was begun in the reign of King James VI and I in the early seventeenth century. The magnificent ramparts date from the reign of Queen Elizabeth fifty years earlier.

  • title: Berwick-upon-Tweed
  • accession number: NG 2121
  • artist: Samuel BoughEnglish (1822 - 1878)
  • gallery: Paxton House
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Bridges Rivers
  • materials: Oil on panel
  • date created: 1863
  • measurements: 20.10 x 29.20 cm (framed: 43.10 x 52.20 x 9.00 cm)
  • credit line: Bequest of Miss Ida M Hayward 1950
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Samuel Bough

Samuel Bough

Although born in England, Bough became one of the most influential figures in the development of nineteenth-century Scottish landscape painting. A largely self-taught artist, he spent the early part of his career in Manchester and Glasgow painting scenes for theatrical sets. Bough later dedicated himself to landscape painting, and became adept at illustrating the fleeting effects of weather. This is especially clear in his paintings of Cadzow Forest in South Lanarkshire. He settled in Edinburgh in 1855, and was elected a member of the Royal Scottish Academy the following year. Bough enjoyed tremendous popularity as an artist. His views of rivers and ports of the 1850s and 1860s show his masterful combination of realism and expressive colouring to capture natural effects.