About this artwork

Boudin first visited Trouville in about 1861 or 1862 and painted there each year throughout the rest of his career. This work belongs to a series of seascapes in which he recorded the dinghies and sailing ships that regularly visited the harbour. The small scale and sketchiness of the painting indicate that it was executed quickly in the open air, although there is evidence of some deliberation in the pencil underdrawing. Boudin’s subject matter, technique and light palette are comparable only to Jongkind, who also specialised in seascapes. Both artists had a profound influence on a number of Impressionist artists, including Monet, Sisley and Pissarro.

  • title: A Fishing Boat, Trouville
  • accession number: NG 2351
  • artist: Louis-Eugene BoudinFrench (1824 - 1898)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • date created: About 1892 - 1896
  • measurements: 27.10 x 21.30 cm
  • credit line: Bequest of Dr Robert A Lillie 1977
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Louis-Eugene Boudin

Louis-Eugene Boudin

Boudin, one of the most distinguished French artists of the second half of the nineteenth century, contributed directly to the development of Impressionism through his active encouragement of Monet. His open air sketches and paintings of the Normandy coast, capturing the effects of light and atmosphere with vigorous brush work inspired the younger artist to pursue his interests in similar directions. Boudin's sympathetic response to the sea and coast developed as a young cabin boy. He then became a stationer and framer in Le Havre before receiving a scholarship to study painting in Paris. Boudin settled in Honfleur in 1860 and contributed to the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874.