Pierre Bonnard

Ruelle à Vernonnet [Lane at Vernonnet] (About 1912 - 1914)

About this artwork

In 1912 Bonnard bought a house in Vernonnet a village on the Seine, north west of Paris. He became good friends with fellow artist Claude Monet who lived in the nearby town of Giverny. When Bonnard moved to Vernonnet he abandoned the dark colours he had used in his early work for a palette of glowing purples, pinks, greens and yellows, as seen in this painting. Like many other artists, Bonnard found that the bright light led him to paint in more vibrant tones.

  • title: Ruelle à Vernonnet [Lane at Vernonnet]
  • accession number: GMA 2932
  • artist: Pierre BonnardFrench (1867 - 1947)
  • gallery: Scottish National Gallery Of Modern Art One(On Display)
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Villages
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: About 1912 - 1914
  • measurements: 76.00 x 65.20 cm (framed: 94.00 x 83.00 x 10.50 cm)
  • credit line: Purchased with funds given by Mrs Charles Montagu Douglas Scott, 1961
  • copyright: © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2016.
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Pierre Bonnard

Pierre Bonnard

Born near Paris, Bonnard studied law, but by the late 1880s had given this up for painting. In 1887 he met the artists Edouard Vuillard, Maurice Denis and Paul Sérusier. Taking their inspiration from Gauguin, in 1888 they formed the Nabis group (the name derives from the Hebrew word for 'Prophets'). In 1912 Bonnard bought a house in Vernonnet, a village on the Seine, north west of Paris. He spent most of his time there until 1925, when he moved to the south of France, but still returned to Vernonnet frequently. Bonnard's paintings are characterised by a great richness of colour and sense of warmth. As well as landscapes and domestic, interior scenes, Bonnard frequently painted his wife, naked in her bath or bedroom.