About this artwork

In 1840 work began on the Scott Monument, which was designed by George Meikle Kemp and celebrates Scotland’s most famous author, Sir Walter Scott. From 1843 until its completion two years later, Hill and Adamson charted the monument’s progress. In order to get a clear view of the building works, they hoisted themselves and their equipment onto the roof of what is now the Royal Scottish Academy. In this image, the neo-gothic steeple of the monument is about half its final height. The background has since changed; the row of houses to the right no longer exists and the view of Calton Hill has been obscured by the Balmoral, a large hotel on Princes Street.

David Octavius Hill

Robert Adamson

David Octavius Hill

A painter and a lithographer by training, David Octavius Hill is best remembered for the beauty of the calotypes he and Robert Adamson produced together. Hill was a sociable and kind-hearted man who did much to support the arts in Scotland and between 1830 and 1836 he was the unpaid Secretary of the newly established Royal Scottish Academy. After Adamson's death, Hill's attempt to start a new partnership with the photographer Alexander MacGlashan around 1860 failed. Hill is to this day revered as one of the first in the trade who transformed photography into an art form.

Robert Adamson

Robert Adamson was one of the first professional photographers, setting up in business in Edinburgh in March 1843. He had aspired to be an engineer but his health was too poor. His brother, John, who was involved in the early experiments with photography in St Andrews, taught him the calotype process. Shortly after opening his studio on Calton Hill, Robert met the painter David Octavius Hill. They worked together for a few weeks on studies for a grand painting of the Free Church of Scotland before entering into partnership to explore the possibilities of photography. Despite Adamson's early death, the two produced some of the most impressive works taken in the medium and greatly influenced later practice in the art.