Sir Anthony van Dyck

Queen Henrietta Maria, 1609 - 1669. Queen of Charles I (Published 1854)

About this artwork

The youngest daughter of Henry IV of France, Henrietta Maria married Charles I in 1625. During the Civil War she was devoted to her husband’s cause and sold much of her jewellery and silver to fund his campaign. In 1644 she moved to France and was soon joined by members of the Royal court fleeing the war in England. Five years later her husband was executed after being convicted of treason. Henriette Maria (as she was known after moving to France) spent the rest of her life in mourning clothes and sought to promote her son, Charles, as king, which eventually happened in 1660 following the Restoration. This print of Henriette Maria is based on a portrait by Sir Anthony van Dyck painted in 1632. It was extremely popular and a number of copies were made and circulated throughout the country.

Sir Anthony van Dyck

Jean Ferdinand Joubert

Sir Anthony van Dyck

Van Dyck is perhaps most famous for the grand and elegant portraits he painted of the British aristocracy when he was court painter to King Charles I. He trained in Antwerp, and worked in Rubens’s studio as an assistant. His outstanding talents were recognised and encouraged by Rubens, who described him as his ‘best pupil’. Van Dyck developed his sumptuous portrait style during time spent in Italy, but also painted impressive religious, allegorical and mythical works. After returning to Antwerp for several years, Van Dyck moved to London in 1632, having accepted the King’s invitation to work for him, and remained there for the rest of his short but influential career.

Jean Ferdinand Joubert

Born in Paris, Joubert studied under the engraver, Henriquel-Dupont. Joubert then moved to London where he lived for many years engraving portraits after important artists such as Sir Anthony van Dyck.