About this artwork

This full-length portrait probably depicts Andrew Macpherson of Cluny, who succeeded his grandfather as 15th Chief around 1660. Andrew’s father Ewan, who fought with Montrose in the Civil War, had died two years previously. Andrew himself died unmarried and was succeeded by his brother Duncan. There are four versions of this portrait, which indicates that despite his short life Andrew Macpherson was considered to be an important member of the family. Experts have argued over the identity of the artist and the date of the painting. It is now thought unlikely that the portrait was painted during the lifetime of Andrew Macpherson. Instead it is believed to be a posthumous portrait, dating from the 1720s. The painting holds most interest as an early depiction of Highland dress.

  • title: Andrew Macpherson of Cluny, 1640 - 1666. 15th Chief
  • accession number: PG 1546
  • artist: Richard WaittScottish (active 1708 - died 1733)
  • depicted: Andrew Macpherson of Cluny
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: About 1725
  • measurements: 76.20 x 64.10 cm (framed: 83.80 x 71.20 x 5.00 cm)
  • credit line: Given by J.A. Pearson 1950
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Richard Waitt

Richard Waitt

Waitt specialised in portraiture, but began his career as a decorative painter. His first recorded work is a coat of arms for the Earl of Hopetoun. He may have trained in the Edinburgh studio of the painter John Scougal and seems to have produced several different types of painting, notably still life. He married into a family with Jacobite sympathies and possibly left the country, temporarily, after the 1715 Jacobite Rising. He must have returned by 1722, however, when he resumed work for the Clan Grant based in Castle Grant, Strathspey. Waitt's series of portraits formed a unique clan gallery.