About this artwork

This image of Ben Ledi was produced in 1911, and by 1925 had become one of the most desirable and expensive Scottish prints. Here, Cameron used a combination of etching and drypoint to create the strong and dramatic contrasts of light and shade, resulting in a rich and full-toned image. Ben Ledi is a mountain set in the picturesque scenery of Perthshire, and its name means ‘Hill of the Gods’ in Gaelic. It was a constant source of inspiration for Cameron, who painted Ben Ledi many times in a variety of different seasons and atmospheres. His canvas in the National Gallery of Scotland’s collection (NG 2443) shows the mountain in autumn.

Sir David Young Cameron

Sir David Young Cameron

Cameron was a successful painter and a very influential etcher. Strong tonal contrasts characterise his prints and his stark and dramatic paintings, which are mainly landscapes and cityscapes. He studied at Glasgow School of Art before joining life classes at the Royal Scottish Academy. His work was acclaimed in Edinburgh, London, Berlin and Munich. During the First World War, Cameron was appointed official war artist to the Canadian government and in 1933 was made the King's Painter in Scotland. Cameron bequeathed his superb collection of Rembrandt etchings to the National Gallery of Scotland, having served on its Board of Trustees for twenty-five years.