About this artwork

John Campbell was born at Loudoun Castle, near Galston. A professional soldier, he raised a regiment of Highlanders to fight the Jacobites during the 1745 Rising. He served as adjutant-general to Sir John Cope, commander-in-chief of the government forces. At the battle of Prestonpans parts of his regiment were captured. Loudoun subsequently went north to Inverness to raise another force and took part in a number of further operations against the Jacobites. In February 1746 his attempt to capture Prince Charles at Moy Hall ended in failure. Later in his career he became commander-in-chief of the British forces in North America, serving against the French with little success. During the Seven Years' War Loudon commanded the British troops in Portugal against Spain.

Allan Ramsay

Allan Ramsay

Ramsay, named after his father who was a poet, was internationally renowned for his outstanding portraits. He attended the new Academy of St Luke in Edinburgh and then continued his artistic education in Italy. He visited Rome, studying at the French Academy and Naples. British residents commissioned many portraits from him and as soon as he returned to London he established a successful studio. He also returned to Edinburgh regularly. King George III appointed him King's painter. As a gifted conversationalist and writer of essays, Ramsay pursued his scholarly interests when injury to his right arm in 1773 cut short his painting career.