Andre Breton

Poème Objet [Poem-Object] (1935)

About this artwork

Breton's personal contribution to surrealist art was his fusion of poetry and object in his 'Poème-Objet' constructions. Although not an artist himself, he was eager to explore any technique that required minimum artistic skill, such as the collages and assemblages. In 1924, Breton called for the creation of objects seen in dreams. He made about a dozen of his own assemblages in the 1930s and early 1940s, calling them 'Poème-Objets'. The text on the plaster egg in this work translates as 'I see / I imagine' and the poem beneath is deliberately cryptic.

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Andre Breton

Andre Breton

André Breton was the founder and chief theorist of the surrealist movement. Through his study of medicine and work with the insane, he became interested in irrational imagery. After serving as a medical auxiliary during the First World War, he discovered the work of Sigmund Freud. The subjects of psychiatry, the illogical and the unconscious mind appealed greatly to the Surrealists. By 1924 Breton had become a prominent figure in the Parisian avant garde and had gathered around him a group of poets and artists interested in exploring the subconscious. The surrealist movement was launched that year with Breton's 'Manifesto of Surrealism'.