James Craig Annan

Stirling Castle (About 1903)

About this artwork

The great American photographer, Alfred Stieglitz described J. Craig Annan as: 'A true artist, and a decidedly poetic one at that'. His photogravure of Stirling Castle was executed in this spirit. The gravure print was a process that Annan and his father, Thomas Annan, learned in Vienna from its inventor, Karl Klic in 1883. The Glasgow photographer was proud of his Scottishness and some have read a nationalist statement into this picture. Although the castle looks proud and untouchable up on the crag, it overlooks a farmyard - an element which instantaneously makes this an informal and accessible image.

James Craig Annan

James Craig Annan

James Craig Annan, the son of the photographer Thomas Annan, studied Chemistry and Natural Philosophy before joining the family firm T. Annan. His work was exhibited by Alfred Stieglitz in New York and illustrated in the journal 'Camera Work'. Annan was a member of the photographic association The Linked Ring and in 1904 became the first President of the International Society of Pictorial Photographers. He renewed public interest in the work of Hill and Adamson by producing exquisite photogravures from their calotype negatives. In later years he became an etchings dealer and no longer exhibited his own work.