About this artwork

The son of a Paisley carpenter and architect, Henning began modelling portraits in wax after seeing an exhibition of wax figures in his home town. His portrait medallions became very popular and he obtained a wide range of sitters, including Sir Walter Scott, James Watt and Princess Charlotte, daughter of George IV. In 1812 he visited London to see the newly arrived Elgin marbles. Intending to stay only two weeks, he spent the next twelve years drawing and making models of the Parthenon friezes, encouraged by Princess Charlotte. Assisted by his son John, Henning carved replica friezes for the decoration of buildings such as the Athenaeum in Pall Mall, London. Unfortunately, his smaller replicas in plaster were unprotected by copyright and were heavily pirated.

  • title: John Henning, 1771 - 1851. Sculptor
  • accession number: PG 1375
  • artist: Robert Scott LauderScottish (1803 - 1869)
  • depicted: John Henning
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Visual arts
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: About 1840
  • measurements: 23.50 x 19.70 cm (framed: 41.30 x 37.50 x 8.00 cm)
  • credit line: Purchased 1938
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Robert Scott Lauder

Robert Scott Lauder

Lauder was born in Edinburgh and was encouraged by David Scott to become a painter. He studied at the Trustees' Academy in Edinburgh for two years from 1822. Lauder spent time in London and then five years in Italy. He returned to London and was best known for his subject pictures, often based on the works of Sir Walter Scott, but he never received the official recognition he sought. He returned to Edinburgh in 1852 as Director of the Trustees' Academy. Lauder was also a hugely influential teacher. His pupils included Orchardson, Pettie, McTaggart and Chalmers.