About this artwork

The drawings in this sketchbook were made in and around Fort George and Inverness, shortly after the 1745 Jacobite uprising. This amusing caricatured group shows a meeting of the Board of Ordnance – the fore-runner of the Ordnance Survey, who were responsible for making maps. The Board began their military survey of remote areas of the Scottish Highlands in September 1747, soon after which Sandby was appointed as draughtsman to the project. It was part of a wider campaign to restore peace and control to the area following the events of 1745. It was during this survey that Sandby made this humorous drawing of his fellow board members. It looks forward to the satires he made on his eventual return to the south.

  • title: Sketchbook of Drawings Made in the Highlands: A Meeting of the Board of Ordnance
  • accession number: D 5339 A
  • Attributed to: Paul SandbyEnglish (1731 - 1809)
  • artist: Unknown
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Work on paper
  • medium: Watercolour
  • date created: About 1749
  • measurements: 16.30 x 25.50 cm; 17.50 x 26.00 cm
  • credit line: Purchased 1993
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve Antonia Reeve Antonia Reeve

Paul Sandby

Paul Sandby

Sandby is best known for his topographical and picturesque landscapes in watercolour. He probably learned drawing from his brother Thomas, and like him became a military draughtsman for the Board of Ordnance at the Tower of London. In 1747 Sandby was appointed chief draughtsman to the Military Survey in Scotland, established in the wake of the Jacobite rebellion of 1745. Based in Edinburgh, where he taught Robert Adam drawing, he travelled throughout the country producing detailed maps for the army and painting both topographical and picturesque views. In 1768 he became a founder member of the Royal Academy, London.