About this artwork

In this large watercolour Cameron used a restrained palette to create a feeling of solitude and serenity as the evening light fades. This drawing was probably made in 1905, two years after Cameron moved into his new house ‘Dun Eaglais’ in Kippen. The house had spectacular views of the Forth Valley and Trossachs to the north, and the Garunnock Hills and Stirling Castle to the east. The ever-changing Stirlingshire landscape was probably the source for this watercolour. Cameron first exhibited this work at the Royal Watercolour Society’s Spring Exhibition in 1905. A similar composition, also dating from around 1905, is in the Fleming-Wyfold Collection, London.

Sir David Young Cameron

Sir David Young Cameron

Cameron was a successful painter and a very influential etcher. Strong tonal contrasts characterise his prints and his stark and dramatic paintings, which are mainly landscapes and cityscapes. He studied at Glasgow School of Art before joining life classes at the Royal Scottish Academy. His work was acclaimed in Edinburgh, London, Berlin and Munich. During the First World War, Cameron was appointed official war artist to the Canadian government and in 1933 was made the King's Painter in Scotland. Cameron bequeathed his superb collection of Rembrandt etchings to the National Gallery of Scotland, having served on its Board of Trustees for twenty-five years.