About this artwork

Cameron’s watercolour of the West Coast of Scotland shows a view from the mainland over to the islands, which stretch out across the horizon. He has captured the brilliant effects of the setting sun on the landscape, as its rays penetrate the thin cloud and radiate upon the land and water. In both the roof of a foreground farm building, and in the calm Atlantic Ocean behind, Cameron left areas without any colour, where the dazzling evening sun has had an almost bleaching effect. He applied very thin washes of watercolour to the painting and added minimal detail. This gives the scene an overall haziness, and adds to the sense of languidness as the day ends.

Sir David Young Cameron

Sir David Young Cameron

Cameron was a successful painter and a very influential etcher. Strong tonal contrasts characterise his prints and his stark and dramatic paintings, which are mainly landscapes and cityscapes. He studied at Glasgow School of Art before joining life classes at the Royal Scottish Academy. His work was acclaimed in Edinburgh, London, Berlin and Munich. During the First World War, Cameron was appointed official war artist to the Canadian government and in 1933 was made the King's Painter in Scotland. Cameron bequeathed his superb collection of Rembrandt etchings to the National Gallery of Scotland, having served on its Board of Trustees for twenty-five years.