About this artwork

In this vibrantly coloured portrait, Charles I is wearing the ribbon and badge of the Order of the Garter, which depicts St George on horseback slaying a dragon. The painting is believed to be a copy of a full-length portrait by the Dutch artist Daniel Mytens, who was the principal painter at the Stuart court from the early 1620s to the mid-1630s. Charles was defeated in the English Civil War (1642 - 51) and was tried for treason in Westminster Hall in January 1649. Convicted, he was sentenced to death.

  • title: Charles I, 1600 - 1649. Reigned 1625 - 1649
  • accession number: PG 306
  • artist: UnknownDutch
  • after: Daniel Mytens (about 1590 - about 1647)
  • depicted: Charles I
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: Royalty
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: after 1626
  • measurements: 74.30 x 62.20 cm (framed 95.00 x 82.80 x 8.20 cm)
  • credit line: Bequeathed by William Findlay Watson 1886

Daniel Mytens

Daniel Mytens

Daniel Mytens, who came from a family of painters, was born in Delft and trained in The Hague. He was in London by 1618 when he was working for the Earl and Countess of Arundel. He first painted King James VI and I in 1621 and was appointed 'picture-drawer' to Charles I on his accession to the throne in 1625. Until the arrival of Van Dyck at the court in 1632 he was the favoured portrait painter of the royal family and leading aristocrats. Superceded by Van Dyck, he retired to The Hague where he continued to work for his old patron, the Earl of Arundel, helping him acquire works of art.