Catherine Ouless

Andrew Carnegie, 1835 - 1919. Ironmaster and philanthropist (1925)

About this artwork

The son of a struggling Dunfermline weaver, Carnegie emigrated to America during the depression of the 1840s. His energetic nature and a talent for being in the right industry at the right time made him a huge fortune in railroads and steel. Carnegie's attitude to labour was unsentimental; workers soon found their wages reduced and their unions undermined. At the age of 65 Carnegie sold his business and 'retired' to Skibo Castle in Scotland. His personal conviction, “The man who dies thus rich, dies disgraced” made him give away some £350 million, which among other things paid for 2811 free public libraries in the US and Britain. This painting is a copy after the original by Walter William Ouless, commissioned from his eldest daughter, Catherine, in 1925.

Catherine Ouless

Walter William Ouless

Catherine Ouless

Catherine Ouless was the eldest daughter of Walter William Ouless, a very successful society portraitist who was born in Jersey but lived and worked his entire adult life in London. Although an occasional portraitist, Catherine usually painted landscapes. During the brief period in which she worked in London she exhibited four works at the Royal Academy.

Walter William Ouless

Walter William Ouless was born on Jersey, the son of a painter of marine subjects. Ouless first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1869 and was made a member of the Academy in 1881. He initially focussed on history painting, but on the advice of Sir John E. Millais switched to portraiture. His sitters included many of the leading figures of nineteenth and early twentieth century Britain, including Charles Darwin, Thomas Hardy and Edward VII.