About this artwork

The live volcano of Vesuvius is situated just to the east of Naples, and is one of the great natural wonders of Southern Italy. Turner visited it in 1819, but this study was influenced by the watercolours of John Robert Cozens that he had seen back in London. It does not, however, correspond exactly to any of Cozens’ own views of Naples. Turner seems to have followed Cozens more stylistically, particularly in his delicate blue-gray palette.

  • title: Vesuvius and the Convent of San Salvatore
  • accession number: D 5023.42
  • artist: Joseph Mallord William TurnerEnglish (1775 - 1851)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Work on paper
  • subject: Mountains
  • medium: Chalk on paper
  • date created: 1794 - 1797
  • measurements: 32.20 x 49.00 cm (framed: 66.00 x 53.80 cm)
  • credit line: Miss Helen Barlow Bequest 1976

Joseph Mallord William Turner

Joseph Mallord William Turner

Turner transformed the art of landscape painting in Britain. From detailed topographical studies to expansive, atmospheric vistas his works celebrate the diversity and emotive power of nature. He was born in Covent Garden, the son of a barber, and exhibited his earliest sketches in his father's shop before studying at the Royal Academy Schools. Turner became the youngest ever full member of the Royal Academy in 1802. His experimental use of watercolour and oils achieved stunning effects, attracting contemporary criticism and praise. Turner's admiration of past masters, above all Claude Lorraine, and the numerous sketches made on many tours in Britain and abroad, provided the basis for his 'sublime' land and seascapes.