About this artwork

The foreground figures help establish the scale of this awe inspiring view over the remote Loch Coruisk. The Cuillin Mountains soar above the loch like gigantic waves. Water, rock and cloud fuse together in a whirling vortex. Turner skilfully conveys the powerful grandeur of the scene on a small sheet of paper, drawing on his memory and the pencil sketches he made after the spectacular climb from the loch-shore. Turner had travelled north from Edinburgh in 1831 to prepare suitable subjects for his illustrations of Scott's works. This appeared as the frontispiece to Cadell's edition of 'Lord of the Isles.'

see media

Joseph Mallord William Turner

Joseph Mallord William Turner

Turner transformed the art of landscape painting in Britain. From detailed topographical studies to expansive, atmospheric vistas his works celebrate the diversity and emotive power of nature. He was born in Covent Garden, the son of a barber, and exhibited his earliest sketches in his father's shop before studying at the Royal Academy Schools. Turner became the youngest ever full member of the Royal Academy in 1802. His experimental use of watercolour and oils achieved stunning effects, attracting contemporary criticism and praise. Turner's admiration of past masters, above all Claude Lorraine, and the numerous sketches made on many tours in Britain and abroad, provided the basis for his 'sublime' land and seascapes.