About this artwork

Baird was a prolific inventor, one of the leading pioneers of television. In 1923 he transmitted his first shadowy televised images in a rented room in Hastings. In 1926 he publicly demonstrated the world’s first recognisable television pictures. Two years later he transmitted the first trans-Atlantic television pictures from London to New York. He also developed colour television, stereoscopic (3D) television, and 'Noctovision' - television in darkness using infra-red light. Baird’s electro-mechanical television system was broadcast by the BBC from 1929-35. However, by early 1937 the BBC chose to adopt the rival Marconi-EMI television system. Baird’s later career was spent developing cinema television, stereoscopic television and high definition colour television.

James Kerr-Lawson

James Kerr-Lawson

James Kerr-Lawson was only three when his family emigrated from Fife to Hamilton, Ontario. When he reached adulthood he returned to Europe, eventually settling in London, but he maintained links with the artistic community in Canada. He fought in the First World War and in 1917 was commissioned by the Canadian Government to paint the ruined cities of Arras and Ypres. Kerr-Lawson was best known as a portrait painter and muralist.