Bryan Wynter

Cyclamen (Dated 1948)

About this artwork

‘Cyclamen’ is an example of Wynter’s approach to painting in the late 1940s, before he evolved a more abstract style for which he is better known. In 1946 Wynter saw a Georges Braque exhibition at the Tate Gallery and this influenced his approach for several years. This is visible here in the breaking down of the composition into surfaces, creating an angular, cubist feel. The scene beyond the still life shows a view across the bay at Wynter’s home, The Carn, near St Ives. Across the paper is an underlying texture created by a monotype print, which Wynter used as the initial base for most of his gouaches at this time. It creates a unique surface that the artist built into the overall patterning, identifiable here in the surface texture of the plant’s leaves.

  • title: Cyclamen
  • accession number: GMA 3527
  • artist: Bryan WynterEnglish (1915 - 1975)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Work on paper
  • subject: Flowers Cubism Still life
  • date created: Dated 1948
  • measurements: 50.50 x 37.40 cm (irregular) (framed: 58.00 x 73.30 x 3.20 cm)
  • credit line: Bequeathed by Miss Elizabeth Watt 1989
  • copyright: © Estate of Bryan Wynter. All rights reserved, DACS 2016
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

Bryan Wynter

Bryan Wynter

Born in London, Bryan Wynter moved to Cornwall after the Second World War, where he became an important figure on the local art scene. Living and working in a remote cottage above the village of Zennor, near St Ives, for twenty years, Wynter was able to immerse himself in nature and the landscape. His early work consists of small paintings of Cornish subjects, but his style began to change in the mid 1950s. In 1956, Wynter painted the first of the large, abstract canvases with which he is associated. Still influenced by nature, although not directly representational, Wynter’s paintings are built up of interlocking brushstrokes, which appear to have developed organically. He also looked to Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism and Eastern philosophy for inspiration.