Paolo Farinati

The Virgin and Child [Verso: The Baptism Between a Standing Bishop and a (?) Saint; Figure of a Putto Below] (1560 - 1580)

About this artwork

This drawing was previously considered severely rubbed and thought to have been strengthened by a later hand. The slightly unusual appearance of the handling in fact results from clarifications that were made by Farinati himself. While his original brush and wash drawing was still damp, he reinforced the contours using either black chalk or charcoal. This resulted in the heavily outlined and brightly highlighted figures seen here.

  • title: The Virgin and Child [Verso: The Baptism Between a Standing Bishop and a (?) Saint; Figure of a Putto Below]
  • accession number: D 749
  • artist: Paolo FarinatiItalian (1524 - 1606)
  • depicted: The Virgin Mary
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Work on paper
  • subject: Christianity Religious
  • date created: 1560 - 1580
  • measurements: 23.70 x 43.50 cm
  • credit line: David Laing Bequest to the Royal Scottish Academy transferred 1910

Paolo Farinati

Paolo Farinati

Farinati was born in Verona and became the city’s leading painter in the later part of the sixteenth century after his compatriot Paolo Veronese moved to Venice in the early 1550s. Farinati was not only a successful painter, but also a prolific and accomplished draughtsman. According to Vasari, Farinati was a pupil of Nicolò Giolfino, who encouraged him to concentrate on line as opposed to colour. He absorbed the influences of the fashionable Mannerist style of his youth, and the powerful figure style of Michelangelo. His work reflected this throughout his career. Farinati admired Veronese’s strong use of chiaroscuro and coarse brushwork, and incorporated these into his own paintings.