About this artwork

Farinati produced this drawing as part of a preparatory design for a frescoed frieze in the Casa Sebastiani (now the Biblioteca Civica), Verona. The frieze represents the climax in the Old Testament story of Ahasuerus, the powerful king of Persia, and his queen Esther. Their wicked chief minister Haman had plotted to exterminate all the Jews of the kingdom, and managed to persuade the King to allow him to do so. Unbeknown to Haman, the queen was Jewish and she overheard his plot. Esther exposed Haman’s treachery, thereby saving her people. Haman was to be executed, but some of his supporters rose up in defiance. Farinati has represented the Jewish forces’ reaction to this, as they exacted a terrible revenge on the insurgents.

  • title: The Jewish Forces Vanquishing the Supporters of Haman
  • accession number: RSA 153
  • artist: Paolo FarinatiItalian (1524 - 1606)
  • gallery: Scottish National Gallery(Print Room)
  • object type: Work on paper
  • subject: Wars and Conflicts Animals
  • date created: 1586
  • measurements: 23.70 x 43.50 cm
  • credit line: David Laing Bequest to the Royal Scottish Academy on loan 1966
  • copyright: Royal Scottish Academy of Art & Architecture collections, David Laing Bequest (on loan to the Scottish National Gallery)

Paolo Farinati

Paolo Farinati

Farinati was born in Verona and became the city’s leading painter in the later part of the sixteenth century after his compatriot Paolo Veronese moved to Venice in the early 1550s. Farinati was not only a successful painter, but also a prolific and accomplished draughtsman. According to Vasari, Farinati was a pupil of Nicolò Giolfino, who encouraged him to concentrate on line as opposed to colour. He absorbed the influences of the fashionable Mannerist style of his youth, and the powerful figure style of Michelangelo. His work reflected this throughout his career. Farinati admired Veronese’s strong use of chiaroscuro and coarse brushwork, and incorporated these into his own paintings.