Ed Ruscha

Cheese Mold Standard with Olive (1969)

About this artwork

Ruscha explores the iconography of the classic American Standard gas station in this screenprint. Standard Oil was the largest oil company in the world in the early twentieth century. In the 1960s, when Ed Ruscha frequently drove along Route 66 from Los Angeles to his home town in Oklahoma City he would have frequently encountered their gas stations. Ruscha has painted and printed this diagonally thrust Standard gas station motif many times, the composition is consistent throughout but a variety of colours are used in each iteration. The colours of foodstuffs referenced in the title give this version a blue and green hue.

see media
  • title: Cheese Mold Standard with Olive
  • accession number: AL00298
  • artist: Ed RuschaAmerican (born 1937)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Work on paper
  • medium: Screenprint on paper
  • date created: 1969
  • measurements: 65.40 x 101.90 cm (framed: 71.00 x 107.50 x 5.70 cm)
  • credit line: ARTIST ROOMS National Galleries of Scotland and Tate. Lent by Artist Rooms Foundation 2011
  • copyright: © Ed Ruscha.
This artwork is part of Artist Rooms

Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha

Ruscha was born in Omaha, Nebraska. He grew up in Oklahoma and studied in Los Angeles. Ruscha's work is diverse and experimental. Since childhood he has been interested in commercial art, in the form of advertising, comic books and magazines. This led to his first paintings featuring words, produced in the late 1950s. Ruscha is equally known for his books of deadpan photographs, such as 'Twenty-six Gasoline Stations' of 1963 and volumes of banal photographs of buildings. In his work Ruscha aims to challenge accepted concepts of language and meaning, often by combining unrelated words and images.