Stuart Franklin

Harvesting Barley Along the Strathmore Valley, Near Coupar Angus

About this artwork

In 2007 the Scottish National Portrait Gallery commissioned Stuart Franklin to capture the diversity of Scottish farming, ranging from large managed estates to family allotments. His camera has traced the environmental damage caused by intensive forestry in the Trossachs to the impact of mobile phone masts on the landscape near Montrose. This dramatic photograph captures a combine harvester in a freshly reaped barley field. The grey, stormy sky contrasts sharply against the golden warmth of the crop. The machine, as it trundles up the field spilling smoke in its wake, shows the industrialised side of farming rather than the rural ideal.

  • title: Harvesting Barley Along the Strathmore Valley, Near Coupar Angus
  • accession number: PGP 755.1
  • artist: Stuart Franklin (born 1956)
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Photograph
  • subject: Plants and agriculture
  • date created: Unknown
  • measurements: 77.00 cm x 112.00 cm
  • credit line: Commissioned 2007

Stuart Franklin

Stuart Franklin

Stuart Franklin is perhaps best known for taking one of the most iconic images of the twentieth century - a student defying a row of tanks in Tiananmen Square, for which he won a World Press Award. Franklin studied photography and film at West Surrey College of Art and Design, graduating in 1979. Later he studied Geography at Oxford University before completing a PhD in the subject in 2002. He began his career as a photographer in the 1980s as a correspondent for Sygma Agence Presse in Paris. His images of the Sudan famine in 1984-5 won great critical acclaim. In 1985 he joined Magnum Photos and went on to become president, a post he held from 2006-9. Since 2004 Franklin has focussed more exclusively on long-term projects often relating to his interest in geography.