About this artwork

After King James IV was killed at the Battle of Flodden, his widow, Queen Margaret, outwitted the Scottish Lords in their bid to gain possession of her children, including the heir, James V. She confronted the Lords at the gates of Stirling Castle, forced them to declare their errand, and then shut the portcullis between herself and them. Unfortunately for Margaret, her defiance was short lived. She renounced her position as regent by marrying Archibald Douglas, 6th Earl of Angus, and as a result her children were taken from her and placed in the care of their uncle John Stewart, Duke of Albany. Interestingly, Faed set his scene at the gates of Edinburgh Castle, but his reason for doing this is unknown.

  • title: Queen Margaret's Defiance of the Scottish Parliament
  • accession number: NG 2527
  • artist: John FaedScottish (1819 - 1902)
  • depicted: Margaret Tudor
  • gallery: In Storage
  • object type: Painting
  • subject: History
  • medium: Oil on canvas
  • date created: 1859
  • measurements: 75.60 x 99.30 cm
  • credit line: Purchased 1991
  • photographer: Antonia Reeve

John Faed

John Faed

As a young boy John Faed displayed exceptional artistic talent as a portraitist. Despite his father’s objections towards a career as an artist, Faed moved to Edinburgh in 1839 to attend the Trustees’ Academy where he studied life drawing and painting. He began to move away from portraiture and painted more subject pictures. Faed chose scenes from Shakespeare and the Bible, but specialised in Scottish subjects such as those popularised by the novels of Sir Walter Scott. He was elected an associate member of the Royal Scottish Academy in 1847, and a full member in 1851. In 1857 he spent four months travelling in the Middle East, where he collected numerous props to incorporate into his Eastern and biblical pictures. Apart from this trip and a period in London from 1864-69, Faed remained in Scotland.