Edith Tudor-Hart

Isle of Arran Ferry, Scotland (Photographed about 1935)

About this artwork

Tudor-Hart was one of around thirty German-speaking photographers, many of Jewish origin, who either settled or lived briefly in Britain during the 1930s. Collectively they revolutionised British photography, offering new, often more socially critical, ways of seeing. During her time in Britain, Tudor-Hart’s practice developed a nuanced articulation of social identity, particularly in relation to gender and class.

Edith Tudor-Hart

Edith Tudor-Hart

Edith Tudor-Hart, née Suschitzky, was one of the most significant documentary photographers working in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Born in Vienna, she grew up in radical Jewish circles. Edith married Alex Tudor-Hart, a British doctor, and the pair moved to England. There she worked as a documentary photographer, closely associated with the Communist Party, compiling a remarkable archive of images of working people in London and later, the south of Wales. Although still active in the 1950s, the difficulties of finding work as a woman photographer led eventually to Tudor-Hart abandoning photography altogether.