Edith Tudor-Hart

Drying Room, Pit-head Baths, Ashington Colliery, Northumberland (Photographed about 1937)

About this artwork

This photograph was used to illustrate an up-beat investigative article about Tyneside published in the ‘Geographical Magazine’ in 1937. The author sought to dispel the image of the blackened miner deep underground and Ashington, a comparatively modern mine, was held up as a model for the future. The coal districts of the North East were not “bleak or cheerless” and Ashington resembled “rather a modern factory for the production of cosmetics than a colliery”. However, none of Tudor-Hart’s photographs of working miners were reproduced in the article and it is unclear whether she approved of its rather sanitised editorial line.

  • title: Drying Room, Pit-head Baths, Ashington Colliery, Northumberland
  • accession number: PGP 279.48B
  • artist: Edith Tudor-HartAustrian (1908 - 1973)
  • gallery: On Loan
  • object type: Photograph
  • date created: Photographed about 1937
  • measurements: 30.30 x 30.10 cm
  • credit line: Presented by Wolfgang Suschitzky 2004

Edith Tudor-Hart

Edith Tudor-Hart

Edith Tudor-Hart, née Suschitzky, was one of the most significant documentary photographers working in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Born in Vienna, she grew up in radical Jewish circles. Edith married Alex Tudor-Hart, a British doctor, and the pair moved to England. There she worked as a documentary photographer, closely associated with the Communist Party, compiling a remarkable archive of images of working people in London and later, the south of Wales. Although still active in the 1950s, the difficulties of finding work as a woman photographer led eventually to Tudor-Hart abandoning photography altogether.